Friday, 9 November 2012

Grimm Household Tales

The Dijon carousel turns
and turns again,
to spin its enchanted web.
Music from a squeezebox age.

Pied-piper’s pipes lift and lead astray.
Even the dogs grow glassy-eyed.
For Mansard eyebrows twitch at false magic –
that muddle of dust

and clutter-book mystery.
Children bake like milk-fed loaves,
lewd circles burn young flesh,
chaste little backs break.

And April?
April disappears like a black cat in the night.

© Sue Morgan

Millie Martin murder: Trial told baby died from head injury  Update: Case ends  8 Nov
Parents of missing five-year-old  remain convinced their daughter is still alive

Sue Morgan  lives in Northern Ireland. Some of the places you can find her recent work are:   Every Day Poets, the New Poet, the Southword Literary Journal and CrannogMagazine.

19 comments:

  1. Such a strong, sad write, Sue. Hugely thought-provoking. A must read for all.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for the comment Eamon, so sad that stories like this just keep on coming.

      Delete
    2. Beautiful. Sad. Well written.

      Delete
  2. Wow! Beautifully crafted Sue. You can even hear the carousel music and feel the spinning. Nicely done!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Mari...the music from a carousel always has that slightly 'off' feel to me, as though something isn't quite right.

      Delete
  3. This made me cry, Sue. A very strong, hard-hitting poem.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Such sad stories. I am pleased that you thought it a strong poem, thank you for reading and responding.

      Delete

  4. Deeply moving, Sue.
    A sad, but a good write. Enjoy this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Amy, thank you. The stories of childrens' pain is always very moving and deeply tragic.

      Delete
  5. Sue,
    Wonderful write, deeply sad, children's pain is plain wrong but it continues to happen. I too can hear the music, the spinning round and round of the carousel. Maire x

    ReplyDelete
  6. A very poignant well written piece Sue

    ReplyDelete
  7. What a strong black atmosphere you've created here Sue, a dark but brilliant piece
    Rach

    ReplyDelete
  8. Thank you very much for reading this and leaving your comment, Rach.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I love this poem Sue. Such powerful images with rich and beautiful language; a real pleasure to read :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for your response, Kathermans

      Delete
  10. The dark cycles of unease permeate this rich, atmospheric piece, set in the fairy world of vintage France, so atmospheric, enchanting, a place that draws children in, but as the poem says there is horror lurking, a blackness that goes on and on, turning, returning, spinning danger behind the fairy tale facade..

    A brilliant poem...and one that imprints...

    ReplyDelete
  11. Thank you, Barbara. As you say, it is the ever spinning, ever-returning cycles of abuse that are really disturbing.

    ReplyDelete